Prypiat Wildlife: The Animals After Chernobyl

On October 27, 2013 by Lazer Horse
Chernobyl - Prypiat - Wildlife - Radioactive - Lynx

LYNX

The Chernobyl incident of 1986 left a lasting poisonous shroud over hundreds of square kilometres of land. The so-called “zone of alienation” is a circle surrounding the plant, 60km in diameter. The area surrounding Chernobyl is deserted, other than around 300 locals who refused to leave. The towns, roads and cities have been handed back to nature to re-colonise, and have been almost entirely overrun by thriving life.

The area surrounding Chernobyl is deserted, other than around 300 locals who refused to leave. The towns, roads and cities have been handed back to nature to re-colonise, and have been almost entirely overrun by thriving life.

The area surrounding Chernobyl is deserted, other than around 300 locals who refused to leave. The towns, roads and cities have been handed back to nature to re-colonise, and have been almost entirely overrun by thriving life.

People who have to go to Chernobyl to work are only allowed to stay five hours per day for a month, and must then take 15 days off. It’s no joke, scientists think that the area will be habitable again in around 20,000 years.

One of the biggest towns to be evacuated was Pripyat, Ukraine:

Chernobyl - Prypiat - Wildlife - Radioactive - Town Today Chernobyl - Prypiat - Wildlife - Radioactive - Town Today 2

Recently, scientists have installed hidden cameras in Pripyat to record the wildlife that has returned in abundance. Bear’s footprints have been found and species that haven’t been seen in the region for decades now seem to be slowly returning.

Chernobyl - Prypiat - Wildlife - Radioactive - Boar

It’s good to see, but also a little odd that they aren’t getting sick quickly and dying, or giving birth to babies that are in some way compromised.

Starlings, pigeons, swallows and redstart have all been seen nesting and laying actually within the steel and concrete shield erected over the reactor.

Chernobyl - Prypiat - Wildlife - Radioactive - Spotted Eagle

SPOTTED EAGLE

Between 1986 and 1988 the wild boar population increased eightfold. It wasn’t always like this though. The first weeks and months after Chernobyl saw a lot of animal deaths. Mice embryos literally dissolved, horses keeled over because their thyroids were eaten away. Trees were turned red and cattle’s growth was stunted. The next generation of cattle however were surprisingly normal.

Chernobyl - Prypiat - Wildlife - Radioactive - Raccoon Dog

RACCOON DOG

More trap-cam shots on next page…

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